NYC FOREST GARDEN

Persimmon tree

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/31

My Persimmon tree is fruiting this year. First came the bell shape flowers then out popped the fruit. I’ll take a picture of them this weekend.

While researching different persimmons to grow here I found out Saijo was the “best” in terms of taste but its a astringent type so it has to be extremely ripe before eating. I’m not sure if I’m into that. The other super tasty one that isn’t super astringent and can be eaten fresh is Fuyu.

Theres an old Japanese method called hoshi gaki, sort of a loop hole to the astringent factor, you clip the fruit of with the branch, peel the skins leaving a bit of the bottom, massage and dry them, this way it will also be preserve and you can eat these guys throughout winter.

800px-Hoshigaki_Making

Another cool thing about persimmon trees is that after all the leaves have fallen the orange fruit hang on till they get ripe into November. For some reason I could see this pissing my neighbors off.

800px-Diospyros_kaki-9

Recap: 4/09 – 2 years after planting

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/27

The garden is visibly more lush this year and you can really see all the runners and clumpers in the shot below. The perennials are well established after 2 years.

_MG_9809
_MG_9830

Over the winter of 08 I planted winter rye and clover as a cover crop from Seeds of Change I didnt take pictures but I’ll make sure to do it this year.

Recap:4/08 – 1 year after instant succession

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/27
Choppy panorama

Choppy panorama

Sunchokes
Cinnamon Vine
Chives
chamomile
Oregano… Read More
Thyme
Borage
French Sorrel
Italian Dandelion – Chicory
Good King Henry
Ansie Hyssop
Burnet, Salad
Rosemary
Lemon Balm
Lovage
Sweet Cicely
Japanese Edible Daylily
Yarrow
Strawberry
Spearmint
Aa
Arugula
Gooseberries
Goumi
Sajio Persimmon
red clover
white clover
lambs quarter
chickweed
violets
wood sorrel
purslane
dandelion

Species list:

  1. Sunchokes
  2. Cinnamon Vine
  3. Chives
  4. Chamomile
  5. Oregano
  6. Thyme
  7. Borage
  8. French Sorrel
  9. Italian Dandelion
  10. Chicory
  11. Good King Henry
  12. Ansie Hyssop
  13. Burnet, Salad
  14. Rosemary
  15. Lemon Balm
  16. Lovage
  17. Sweet Cicely
  18. Japanese Edible Daylily
  19. Yarrow
  20. Strawberry
  21. Arugula
  22. red clover
  23. white clover
  24. lambs quarter
  25. chickweed
  26. violets
  27. wood sorrel
  28. purslane
  29. dandelion,
  30. Mitsuba
  31. Gooseberries – Poorman variety- suppose to be the sweetest one and best for fresh eating. The Berries fruited after 1 year of being planted.
  32. Goumi – Fixes Nitrogen, will take out in 4 years or so and replace with Goji berries
  33. Sajio Persimmon –  suppose to be the tastiest but is astringent

Recap: 08/07

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/27
urban_forest_garden

3 1/2 months after installation

                                                                   The persimmon tree started off as a twig but grew 2x as large with branches and leaves within the summer.

Recap: 5/07: Sheet Mulching/ Planting

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/27

sheet_1

sheet_02

 

I used a method called sheet mulching, which is made up of a layer of non human poop, a good layer of newspaper(most newspaper use soy ink, dont use glossy pages they have toxic ink in them), a gigantic layer of compost and I topped it off with some wood chips(its hard to find seedless straw in the city). This way the sheet mulch kills everything underneath it while loving it. You then plant your plants by slashing a X into the newspaper and folding it in underneath itself. Everyone will love you for doing this.
Those grey buckets are filled with free compost from the NYC Give Back events.
Im using keyhole beds to maximize the little space i have.

I used a method called sheet mulching, which is made up of a layer of non human poop, a good layer of newspaper(most newspaper use soy ink, dont use glossy pages they have toxic ink in them), a gigantic layer of compost and I topped it off with some wood chips(its hard to find seedless straw in the city). This way the sheet mulch kills everything underneath it while loving it. You then plant your plants by slashing a X into the newspaper and folding it in underneath itself. Everyone will love you for doing this.

Those grey buckets are filled with free compost from the NYC Give Back events.

Im using keyhole beds to maximize the little space i have.

Plants were ordered from the following nurseries. 1-4. had the most awesome healthy plants to 5. had mediocre but a wide selection:

1. Sliver Hill nursery  – Perennials Plants in Union Square Farmers Market
2. One Green World
3. Oikos Tree Crops
4.Rain Tree Nursey
5. Ritchers

Recap: 3/07: Forest Garden, Queens, NY

Posted in Uncategorized by forestgardens on 2009/07/27

Got a permaculture certificate in 06 in MA. decided to try out what I learned back home in NYC.

site (front lawn) before implementation

site (front lawn) before implementation

Site: Lawn in Queens, ny in early March 2007. This is where I will plant a Edible Forest Garden also known as a Food Forest. I have a very limited space, 20x30ft with path and I have to be sort of considerate of my neighbors. In order for it be a forest garden though I will need different levels so a tree, shrubs and various ground cover layers. This form of gardening I believe is the most sustainable and is a form of no till and is low maintenance  and theoretically  can grow totally independently in 10 years.

Quick Design (analysis not posted)

Quick Design (analysis not posted)

Keyhole beds and a swale that will catch some path rain runoff.

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